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Sir Samuel Cemetery

Location: Shire - Leonora
Coordinates: Latitude 27° 38' S Longitude 120° 33' E
Direction - 40 km north west of Leinster and 43 km south of Wiluna

Cemetery
Number of known graves - 30


First Burial

January 2 1900 James Butler a miner aged 50 yrears died of natural causes.


Last burial

April 14 1943 Carlo Paula a Licensed Victualler aged 57 died from cardiac disease and bronchitis.


 

Age at death (Years)

 

0 – 1 year

 2

20 – 29 years

 3

60 – 69 years

 2

2 – 5 years

 1

30 – 39 years

 5 

70 – 79 years

 3

6 – 9 years

 - 

40 – 49 years

 9

80+ years

 -

10 – 19 years

 1

50 – 59 years

 4  unknown  1
Occupation

Apprentice fitter

 1 

Engine driver

 3 

Miner

 10 

Woodcutter

 1 

Boiler maker

 1

Fruiterer

 1

Prospector

 2

   

Bricklayer

 1

Licensed victualler

 1

Teamster

 1

   

Camel driver

 1

Metallurgist

 1

Wife

 2

   
Cause of death

Accident

 6 

Haemorrhge

 1 

Old age

 1 

Suicide

 4 

Aneurysm

 1

Heart failure

 5

Peritonitis

 1

Typhoid fever

 1

Chill and flu

 1

Mining accident

 5

Pneumonia

 1

Unknown

 1

Exposure

 1

Natural causes

 2

Premature birth

 1

   
Town
Discovery

Gold was discovered in the area in 1895. Officials lobbied for a townsite to be created in 1896 following the realisation that the area was becoming an important mining centre. The mining warden suggested 3 possible names, Clifton after himself; Herberton after Herberts the original finder of gold in the area and Newmanton, after A W Newman, the surveyor, but since the area was already well known as Mount Sir Samuel the Mount was dropped and the town became Sir Samuel. The townsite was gazetted in 1897.

The name is derived from the nearby Mount Sir Samuel that was named after Chief Justice and Lieutenant-Governor of South Australia Sir Samuel James Way by the explorer Lawrence Wells who was on a surveying expedition in the area in 1892.


Early History

A police station camp was opened in the town in 1899 which consisted of tents and brush shelters. The camp was later burnt down in 1901. Tenders were called for to build a new station in 1902 that was completed in 1903 but then closed down in 1910 and the building removed to Youanmi in 1911.

In 1938, an article in the Western Mail estimated that Sir Samuel had a population of 4,000 people at its peak (in about 1908), and included two pubs, three banks, a post office, a school, a rifle range, and a racecourse.

The Bellevue mine was working at top pressure and using 100 head of stamps. It was one of the best gold producers in the State.


5 head stamp battery

Interesting Information

a. WA Govt Media Tuesday, 30 October 2018
Ancestral remains returned to Tjiwarl people with repatriation ceremony at Sir Samuel Cemetery
A repatriation ceremony will be held today at the Sir Samuel Cemetery, about 43 kilometres north of Leinster, with the remains of an ancestor of the Tjiwarl people returned to the community and respectfully buried.
The Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage; Western Australian Museum and Tjiwarl Aboriginal Corporation have been working to return an ancestor of the Tjiwarl people to the Sir Samuel Cemetery, as part of the department's ancestral remains repatriation program.
The ancestral remains were collected by the WA Museum in 1899 and cared for at the museum. The 19th and early 20th century practice of collecting human remains reflected the wider interest in indigenous peoples by museums worldwide.

Interesting article (available through trove newspapers)

Western Mail 16 June 1938. Mt Sir Samuel then and now – 30 years


Source Information

Wikepedia
Outback Family History

For current mining activities

Perenti Group

 

Special thanks to...

Research Consultants

Swan Genealogy

  • PO Box 1988
    Wangara DC, Western Australia 6947

  • 0409 680 207

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